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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Archived Fire Damage Blog Posts

Why Ash is Messy When Cleaning

5/5/2020 (Permalink)

Technician on top of a scaffold cleaning the windows. All of our technicians have received the best training and knowledge to get the job done.

When a water or fire damage strikes, the aftermath can be stressful and a whole lot of messy. Did you know fire and water emergencies require major cleanup by specialists?

When a fire occurs, it is burning not only wood but everything else that makes up a structure. This includes insulation, paint, drywall, vinyl and plaster to name a few. Because these materials are not meant to be burned (the components can be harmful), the ash, soot and debris requires a specialist to handle it.

Ash for example is not easy to clean. Once wiped, it will smear and make the walls or furniture discolored. It can easily be sent up into the air when wiped just to settle back onto another section of your home or office. SERVPRO of  Central Glendale‘s commercial grade cleaning products gets the ash cleaned fast and our technicians have gone through hours of training for the knowledge on how to do so. 

If you are having trouble with the aftermath of a fire, please do not hesitate to give us a call at (714) 622-5096 to speak to a specialist today.

Smoke and soot clean up

4/28/2020 (Permalink)

Photo of cleaning soot sponge with dirt Smoke Damage Can Cause a Pervasive Odor in Your Home.

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Garden Grove will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today –  (714) 660-0701

What to Do During a Fire

4/25/2019 (Permalink)

Know What to do During a Fire

  • Get out as quickly and as safely as possible. The less time you are exposed to poisonous gases, the safer you will be.
  • If a stove fire starts, slide a lid over the burning pan and turn off the burner. Leave the lid in place until the pan is completely cool. Using a lid to contain and smother the fire is your safest action. Getting the fire extinguisher or baking soda to extinguish the fire delays action. Flour and other cooking products can react explosively to flame and should never be sprinkled over fire. Moving the pan can cause serious injury or spread the fire. Never pour water on grease fires.
  • If you try to use a fire extinguisher on a fire and the fire does not immediately die down, drop the extinguisher and get out. Most portable extinguishers empty in 8 to 10 seconds. After some residential fires, people have been found dead with fire extinguishers near them or in their arms.
  • If you are escaping through a closed door, feel the door, cracks, and doorknob with the back of your hand before opening the door. If it is cool and there is no smoke at the bottom or top, open the door slowly. If you see smoke or fire beyond the door, close it and use your second way out. If the door is warm, use your second way out. It is a natural tendency to automatically use the door, but fire may be right outside. Feeling the door will warn you of possible danger.
  • If you see smoke or fire in your first escape route, use your second way out. The less time you are exposed to poisonous gases or flames, the safer you will be.
  • If you must exit through smoke, crawl low under the smoke to your exit. Fires produce many poisonous gases. Some are heavy and will sink low to the floor; others will rise carrying soot towards the ceiling. Crawling with your head at a level of 1 to 2 feet above the ground will temporarily provide the best air.
  • Close doors behind you as you escape to delay the spread of the fire.
  • If smoke, heat, or flames block your exit routes and you cannot get outside safely, stay in the room with the door closed. Open the window for ventilation, and hang a sheet outside the window so firefighters can find you. Wait by the window for help. The first thing firefighters will do when they arrive at a fire is check for trapped persons. Hanging a sheet out lets them know where to find you. If there is a phone in the room, call the fire department and tell them where you are.
  • Once you are out, stay out! Firefighters are trained and equipped to enter burning buildings. If someone is still inside, direct them to that person's probable location.
  • Get out first, away from toxic smoke and gases, then call the fire department from a neighbor's home or from an outside phone. If a portable phone is handy during your escape, you may take it with you, but do not waste precious time looking for one. Use your neighbor's phone, a car phone, or nearby pay phone to call for help.